The Gnome Prince

I wrote a fairy tale for my students today. Enjoy.

The Gnome Prince

Gabriel was a poor gnome with a small garden. He grew it for a king and queen across the lake, but his heart belonged to a maiden. She rode by in her carriage each week to court. The gnome tried picking up the nerve to throw himself in front of her horses, but feared injury and the rising cost of healthcare. So, he decided to impress her another way: with corn. But how?

The answer came in the form of a magic toad. He granted wishes in exchange for red hats. Gabriel could wish for the most mesmerizing corn in the land and win the praise of his fair maiden. The gnome had but one red hat however handed down from his grandfather. He hated losing it, as it was precious, but how many chances do you get at true love? Thinking of her flawless hands, he could not resist, and the toad was more than happy to oblige. He greatly enjoyed his collection of red hats.

Gabriel became overjoyed at the prospect of impressing the maiden and planted corn late into the evening. When the sun rose, his neck burnt and sweat poured profusely. It was not so easy missing his hat, but the gnome did not give up. Every time the maiden rode by in her carriage his love for her grew stronger. After many weeks his corn was as high and beautiful as any in the land. The maiden could not help but stop and gaze upon it.

“Oh, Gabriel, did you grow this corn for me?” She asked.

“Why yes, milady,” he replied. The maiden knew his name! Gabriel looked longingly at her.

“But,” she told him, “You need not sell your hat or burn your neck for corn. I have always loved you. Why do you think I have ridden by these past months?”

The gnome smiled as they climbed into her carriage and rode toward the kingdom. They lived happily ever after.

The End

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Book Review: Boy Band by Jacqueline Smith

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Boy Band

by Jacqueline E. Smith

5/5 stars

Boy Band surprised me. I wasn’t sure going in if I would connect with the characters of a modern boy band. Author Jacqueline Smith however is a tremendous writer with a gift for storytelling. Her characters are rich, successful, influential, but still relatable. There’s something very human in their struggle for acceptance and love. And I never knew how lonely or lost people at the top could feel. Add to this the relationships: oh, god, the relationships! They were a rollercoaster ride but I won’t give anything away. My favorite part of Boy Band was that though there was a degree of humor and YA silliness, the author was not afraid to get serious: whether it was the crushing double-edged sword of success or the pitfalls and ramifications of normal breakups. There are also several other observations on life that I found interesting. Whether you’re a girl, a guy, young, or old I think you will find something to enjoy in this book. It’s fascinating to look behind the music and be a part of the band.

Book Review: Borrowed Wings by Regina Puckett

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Borrowed Wings

by Regina Puckett

5/5 stars

It’s no secret I have high expectations for children’s books. I think they should challenge the young and old alike to interpret and feel a broad range of emotions. Borrowed Wings by Regina Puckett hits this on every level. The cover is brilliant, grabbing your attention, and the story is no less fantastic. The artwork and story are supremely touching. I’m 27 years-old and the tale of a mother and son dragon brought tears to my manly eyes. But I’m also a teacher and see great value in the lessons taught about the importance of love and family. You will love this book no matter what your age. I only wish it had gone on forever.